patternsthatconnect

abstract art, a systems view

Posts Tagged ‘Karl Marx

My Interpretation of (an extract from) The Fetishism of Commodities by Karl Marx (via rhetorical pens)

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I thought this was entertaining as well as enlightening. It’s a great example of of what you can achieve by combining text and pictures.

My Interpretation of (an extract from) The Fetishism of Commodities by Karl Marx Marx with pictures! The Fetishism of Commodities – Karl Marx Click on the above link to download the power point. Here’s a sneak preview: … Read More

via rhetorical pens

It reminds me of those ‘Introducing…’ and ‘…for Beginners’ books from Readers and Writers and Icon Books

Could Rhetoricalpens ‘book’  be even better than those? (Rhetorical question, though if you want to answer it in comments please feel free.)

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Written by Andy Parkinson

July 19, 2011 at 7:37 am

Role of the Critic, Updated (via Slow Painting)

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I  saw this two-years-old-blog-post recently, I had been re-reading Peter Fuller’s Beyond the Crisis in Art and blogging about it. (Slow Painting continues to be a good blog by the way. It reads like a press digest of what’s going on in art). What a good photo of Fuller this is!

Role of the Critic, Updated Savage… the art critic Peter Fuller by Jane Bown, 1988 Photograph: Jane Bown/Observer Do art critics have a point any more? Can they contribute anything to the development of art? For a long time I’ve ducked this question. If you’d asked me any time over the past few years, I’d have replied that criticism does not seriously influence art. It has its own justification, however, as literature. If literature seems a pompous word, let’s say enterta … Read More

via Slow Painting

Then, a year after the blog post, there’s a comment by Wallydevilliers that suggests that the role of the critic is to find what’s really good and bring it to our attention. Good point. However, Fuller’s refusal of so much that was going on when he was writing was not really bad publicity (I recognise that the comment was actually about Robert Hughes in relation to Damien Hirst) the publicity had already been had. He was interpreting the meaning of the art works and establishing a position within a Marxist framework. So, reading Fuller was also a way of learning about Marx and socialism (he was just as critical of the positions taken by the Left as he was of the art) and I think he was a good teacher.

He also showed us how to criticise. I don’t always agree with his judgement, but I do find his approach, and his commitment to imagining a world different to the present one, to use an old-fashioned word – edifying.

It is that committed position that I think exemplified his approach and that informed his understanding of the role of the critic: not to entertain but to imagine.

Written by Andy Parkinson

July 3, 2011 at 7:44 am