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abstract art, a systems view

Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

Room to Roam

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Room to Roam

You go yours
and I’ll go mine
the many ways we wend
Many days
and many ways
ending in one end

Many a wrong and its curing song
many a road and many an inn
Room to roam but only one home
for all the world to win

So you go yours
and I’ll go mine
and the many many ways we’ll wend
Many days and many ways
ending in one end

Room to roam but only one home
for all the world to win

So you go yours
and I’ll go mine
and the many many ways we’ll wend
Many days and many ways
ending in one end

Room to roam but only one home
ending in one end

 

George MacDonald (1824 – 1905)

Set to music by Mike Scott in 1990

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Written by Andy Parkinson

August 21, 2013 at 7:00 am

Art and Jazz: Tomorrow at the Old Lockup Studio, Cromford

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Tomorrow sees our one night only exhibition Salon1 at the Old Lockup Studio in Cromford, contemporary art by regional artists (including yours truly) with contemporary jazz by Corey Mwabma.

The connection between modern art and jazz goes back some way. For a start there is Piet Mondrian’s love of Jazz and dance band, evidenced in titles of paintings like Foxtrot A and Foxtrot B, Broadway Boogie-Woogie and Victory Boogie-Woogie, as well as in his writings. He liked Boogie-Woogie, of which he said:

I conceive (it) as homogenous in intention with mine in painting: destruction of melody, which is the equivalent of the destruction of natural appearance, and construction through the continuous opposition of pure means – dynamic rhythm.

There won’t be any Mondrians on show at Salon1

Then there’s Henri Mattise’s artist’s book of 1947 Jazz which he considered to be a “chromatic and rhythmic improvisation” the structure of rhythm and repetition broken by the unexpected action of improvisations.

And there are countless others, including American artist Stuart Davis, who desribed jazz as “a continuous source of inspiration in my work” an American art form in which he discovered “the same quality of art that I found in the best European painting”.

Written by Andy Parkinson

August 17, 2012 at 7:30 am

Corey Mwamba!

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Thank you Clay Smith for introducing me to the music of Corey Mwamba

Isn’t it marvelous?!

Unfortunately I will miss his solo set at the New Art Exchange, Nottingham, on 14 July so I am listening to and downloading music from his website at www.coreymwamba.co.uk for  now.

Written by Andy Parkinson

July 2, 2012 at 7:42 am

Posted in Music

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Sing Sing Sing!

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I wonder of the painting by Jack Bush with the same title (see http://www.supremefiction.com/theidea/2012/04/the-lightness-of-jack-bush.html) was a reference to this tune. Popular models in abstract painting?

 

 

 

 

World Music - the Music Journey

“Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing)” is a 1936 song, written by Louis Prima and first recorded by him with the New Orleans Gang and released in March 1936 as a 78 as Brunswick 7628 (with “It’s Been So Long” as the B side). It is strongly identified with the big band and swing eras. It was covered by Fletcher Henderson and most famously Benny Goodman.

The Benny Goodman’s version

When I learned Quickstep, I danced it with the rhythm of this song

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Written by Andy Parkinson

May 6, 2012 at 6:48 pm

The Music of Painting

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There is an impression that results from a particular juxtaposition of colours, lights and shades: what one might call the music of painting

Eugene Delacroix

… is quoted in the frontispiece of  Peter Vergo’s book The Music of Painting, first published in 2010 and just out in paperback.

 

according to Charles Darwent, Art Quarterly, it’s “a must-have for anyone interested in why modernism looks (and sounds) as it does”

good job I have it then! It was a birthday present, and I have just started reading it.

The front cover shows a reproduction of Theo van Doesburg’s Rhythm of a Russian Dance,1918. Music and dance have an obvious connection with each other and a less obvious one with painting. I have blogged about it before in relation to Mondrian, whose work also features in the book, in a chapter entitled Art, Jazz and Silence. I am also reminded of another book  Music and Modern Art, edited by James Leggio, and containing a chapter by Harry Cooper called Popular Models: Fox-Trot and Jazz Band in Mondrian’s Abstraction.

In a recent Rough Cuts video, James Kalm reviews the Stanley Whitney exhibition Left to Right, at Team Gallery (some great pics here ) saying of Whitney  “His approach to color and rhythm are akin to the spontaneous riffs of great jazz solos”.

In Blogland, Scott Van Holzen’s blog  art in music is dedicated to paintings based on musical themes and Ruth Gray, tells of how listening to some old records, she feels inspired to paint the colours she hears. I guess that making a connection between visual, auditory and kinaesthetic arts is almost bound to get somewhat synaesthetic.